Archana. 16. Chicago. Mainly movies. Can't get anything done.

tracylord:

Myrna Loy + nose scrunch

At the beginning of her career Myrna Loy´s turned-up nose was not as famous yet, rather infamous. She had a little bone on the side of her nose, which cast a shadow in certain lights. This drove the cameramen crazy "because they never knew when it would appear. They’d see the rushes, groan, ‘There’s that thing again,’ and have to retake the scene. It looked like a tiny smudge on my nose. I mean you could hardly see it, but that’s how far the mania for perfection went." So she was often called in for retakes and since those are rather expensive she was once called in by the makeup department who announced that they maybe would fix her nose. "I was horrified. I used to be known as ‘The Nose’ for goodness’ sake—thousands of women went to plastic surgeons to have it duplicated.  I said, ‘Never! Nobody’s touching this nose!’ and got out of there fast.” And she was true. She had the most famous and sought-after nose of the 1930s and women would regularly go to plastic surgeons go get “a nose like Myrna Loy”.

keyframedaily:

Dustin Hoffman by Terry O’Neill.

keyframedaily:

Dustin Hoffman by Terry O’Neill.

marypickfords:

Pierrot le fou (1965)


Leslie Caron & Louis Jourdan fool around on the set of Gigi (1958)

Leslie Caron & Louis Jourdan fool around on the set of Gigi (1958)

annebancrofts:

I remember when we were rehearsing the hotel scene, he [Mike Nichols] took me into a corner and said, ‘Do you remember the first time you had any action at all?’ And I said yeah. It was a sweater feel. I was in junior high school, playing the piano, doing Al Jolson in blackface, if you can believe that, and this girl was in the show, and we were waiting to be called. And we’re kind of attracted to each other, but I can’t get too close to her because of the blackface. And somehow, at one point, I put my hand on her breast.

"Mike said, ‘Let’s do that scene again, and do that to Annie. Don’t tell her. Just find a place to do it.’ So I got up behind her, and just as she takes her sweater off, I put my hand on her breast. And she was brilliant. She just looked at it, and then went back to her sweater, taking a stain out or something. And I started to break. I took my hand off her breast and I turned away and thought, I’m gonna get fired, because breaking is the worst thing you can do. I turned my back on her and Nichols and walked over to the wall and started banging my head against it. And he goes into hysterics. He said, ‘That’s in the movie.’

- Dustin Hoffman 


James Mason

James Mason

posthawk:

Le Samouraï (1967), dir. Jean-Pierre Melville